beasley
Thoughts + beautiful things from someone who's all about technology, print, the beach, & changing lives.
beasley
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care365:

If you really want to get over it, stop talking about it - sidenote no. 25
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typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
typeworship:

Telegramme style
After cultivating a striking visual style over several years Telegramme Studio’s easily recognizable work is in high demand. Large clients, including Habitat and Random House, to small ventures, such as the branding for a friend’s new ‘Hawt Sauce’ have had their products ‘Telegrammed’. I was keen to find out the story behind this prolific studio and how its distinctive identity developed. 
I met up with Bobby Evans who is now the studio’s one-man design team. Telegramme was originally a collaboration of two friends living in different parts of the UK, working via the postal service (his partner, Chris, has since left to set-up a fashion enterprise). After graduating the studio gravitated to East London and has remained in this area for several years. 
Despite nearly being kicked out of university for not conforming to the ‘clean’ brand of graphic design being taught there (aimed at preparing graduates for life in a design agency), Bobby forged even further towards a grittier style more suited to the type of projects he wanted to design for: band posters, record sleeves and skateboards. The type of things his studio is now known for. 
A passion for screen-printing and “broken-down type” contributes to this visual style: “I love the visual aesthetic of screen-printing and the process. It’s not always viable for projects with very short turnaround times—gig posters might only get the go-ahead a few days before they’re needed—but even when I’m designing for digital output I find myself automatically adding in trapping and overlays which result in a particular quality.” 
Texture is another key ingredient: 

“I enjoy emulating the quality of small items that have been blown-up, so you can see the grain and texture in the printed material. However, I’m careful to maintain a modern edge - I don’t want the work to rely on visual trickery or be a pastiche.” 

“Although I started as a graphic designer I found that I’d often need illustrations for my work but rather than hunt down say a specific style of bird for example, I’d simply draw one”. The same goes for Bobby’s lettering but rather than drawing it from scratch he prefers to customise existing type to make it fit the project, looking at the decayed lettering and ‘ghost type’ that you see a lot of around East London for references. 
The passion for designing gig posters is as strong as ever. Even now when he finds out that a band he likes is planning a local gig he’ll get in contact and offer to produce the official posters. And as an active board member of the UK Poster Association (UKPA) he also supports and promotes the work of British poster artists, exhibiting posters around the world at events like SXSW.
You can see more of Bobby’s recent work on tumblr here.
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care365:

Cold places for burning hearts.
Find some of my travel shots on Instagram! Find me as @care_much :)
(or click on the photo)
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"While email can sometimes be a quick and convenient way to gauge interest or disseminate information, it’s often not the best tool for the job, he said. About 20% of the time, we’re using email correctly—leveraging it to communicate across time zones or answer a well-defined question. But 80% of email traffic is ‘waste,’ he said—stuff that’s useless or really requires a phone call or face-to-face discussion."
Why 80% of your emails are a total waste (via fastcompany) - Not sure I agree with this 100%, but I definitely think we are far too dependent on email. It has become the universal language of business communication, and I think we are losing so much valuable collaboration in the process.
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typeworship:

Timeless Alphabets
You can find a world of inspiration in any of Julia Trigg’s collected letters. These playful compositions make a feature of the yellowed, textured papers and vivid inky letters that she’s gathered over the years. 
A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Julia is based in Brighton in the UK. She keeps her eye out for all types of ephemera for use in her work; old stamps, postcards, packaging and woodblock type.
Unlike many of her contemporaries that practice montage work with collected items, she finds herself unable to cut the letters up, preferring instead to scan everything. This not only avoids any of the items fading over time but has the added advantage of enabling her to adjust the scale and colour of the beautiful details.
If you like this style I bet you’d be interested in the lettering work of other illustrators in this area that have featured on Type Worship:
Martin O’Neill: Gifted fidget, and found alphabet
Greg Lamarche: Gorgeous type compositions here and here
Paul Thurlby: Alphabet and other lettering work
typeworship:

Timeless Alphabets
You can find a world of inspiration in any of Julia Trigg’s collected letters. These playful compositions make a feature of the yellowed, textured papers and vivid inky letters that she’s gathered over the years. 
A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Julia is based in Brighton in the UK. She keeps her eye out for all types of ephemera for use in her work; old stamps, postcards, packaging and woodblock type.
Unlike many of her contemporaries that practice montage work with collected items, she finds herself unable to cut the letters up, preferring instead to scan everything. This not only avoids any of the items fading over time but has the added advantage of enabling her to adjust the scale and colour of the beautiful details.
If you like this style I bet you’d be interested in the lettering work of other illustrators in this area that have featured on Type Worship:
Martin O’Neill: Gifted fidget, and found alphabet
Greg Lamarche: Gorgeous type compositions here and here
Paul Thurlby: Alphabet and other lettering work
typeworship:

Timeless Alphabets
You can find a world of inspiration in any of Julia Trigg’s collected letters. These playful compositions make a feature of the yellowed, textured papers and vivid inky letters that she’s gathered over the years. 
A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Julia is based in Brighton in the UK. She keeps her eye out for all types of ephemera for use in her work; old stamps, postcards, packaging and woodblock type.
Unlike many of her contemporaries that practice montage work with collected items, she finds herself unable to cut the letters up, preferring instead to scan everything. This not only avoids any of the items fading over time but has the added advantage of enabling her to adjust the scale and colour of the beautiful details.
If you like this style I bet you’d be interested in the lettering work of other illustrators in this area that have featured on Type Worship:
Martin O’Neill: Gifted fidget, and found alphabet
Greg Lamarche: Gorgeous type compositions here and here
Paul Thurlby: Alphabet and other lettering work
typeworship:

Timeless Alphabets
You can find a world of inspiration in any of Julia Trigg’s collected letters. These playful compositions make a feature of the yellowed, textured papers and vivid inky letters that she’s gathered over the years. 
A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Julia is based in Brighton in the UK. She keeps her eye out for all types of ephemera for use in her work; old stamps, postcards, packaging and woodblock type.
Unlike many of her contemporaries that practice montage work with collected items, she finds herself unable to cut the letters up, preferring instead to scan everything. This not only avoids any of the items fading over time but has the added advantage of enabling her to adjust the scale and colour of the beautiful details.
If you like this style I bet you’d be interested in the lettering work of other illustrators in this area that have featured on Type Worship:
Martin O’Neill: Gifted fidget, and found alphabet
Greg Lamarche: Gorgeous type compositions here and here
Paul Thurlby: Alphabet and other lettering work
typeworship:

Timeless Alphabets
You can find a world of inspiration in any of Julia Trigg’s collected letters. These playful compositions make a feature of the yellowed, textured papers and vivid inky letters that she’s gathered over the years. 
A graduate of the Royal College of Art, Julia is based in Brighton in the UK. She keeps her eye out for all types of ephemera for use in her work; old stamps, postcards, packaging and woodblock type.
Unlike many of her contemporaries that practice montage work with collected items, she finds herself unable to cut the letters up, preferring instead to scan everything. This not only avoids any of the items fading over time but has the added advantage of enabling her to adjust the scale and colour of the beautiful details.
If you like this style I bet you’d be interested in the lettering work of other illustrators in this area that have featured on Type Worship:
Martin O’Neill: Gifted fidget, and found alphabet
Greg Lamarche: Gorgeous type compositions here and here
Paul Thurlby: Alphabet and other lettering work
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fastcompany:

Jerry Seinfeld On The Perfection Of The Coffee Meeting

Seinfeld’s talks to us about his next act, the web series Comedians In Cars Getting Coffee, and why coffee is the perfect, er, vehicle for communication. 

Coffee meetings are perfect, weird little things. Jerry Seinfeld, the Gandalf of little weird perfections, explains why five years ago they became a part of his working life:

“I got married and I had a family and my entire day was not free for social interaction,” he tells NPR. “And eating is annoying and difficult to arrange, [and it’s] hard to choose places. And meeting someone for coffee suddenly seemed like a wonderful, compact, accessible and portable social interaction.”

As we’ve discussed, shared meals and drinks connect people—which, in turn, avails everyone involved to greater opportunities. In this way, a lot of coffee—and a little kindness—can launch a career.
As Seinfeld and NPR host Steve Inskeep discussed, coffee’s so great because it gives us something to with our hands: Seinfeld says that not having a cup to play with is like a comedian without a microphone—using a clip-on thing makes the audience feel uncomfortable. The coffee is a prop, giving you something to look at when you need to think, which is a key to communication, whether workplace or not.
“It also obviously gets people talking,” Seinfeld says, “You have coffee and for some reason it makes you talk a lot.”
The talking has an effect: As an MIT Media Lab study has found, teams that go on coffee breaks are more productive and have stronger social bonds, making it a stimulating—and low cost—management tool. 
And whether you didn’t get enough sleep, you don’t know how to get through the afternoon, or you need a pause in conversation, Seinfeld observes that coffee’s that little help.
“Coffee solves all these problems in one delightful little cup,” he says.
Read the full story here.

[Image: Flickr user Aurimas]

Love this article. So true!
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"You have exactly enough time for the important things in your life. You have exactly enough time for the things you have been called to do."
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There’s good eatin’. And there’s eatin’ good. This is both.
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life:

Happy birthday, Albert Einstein.
Here, a look at a famous picture taken in Albert Einstein’s Princeton office — exactly as he left it — mere hours after the great theoretical physicist and 20th-century icon died in 1955.
(Ralph Morse—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images)

Wow. I would have probably walked by his office and thought… “I cannot imagine that he can ever think clearly or get anything done” - because that’s what I think when I walk by desks in my office that look like this now :) Think twice.
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fastcompany:

How Jenna Lyons Transformed J.Crew Into A Cult Brand
Read here how Jenna Lyons has take J.Crew from ugly duckling to fashion arbiter. 

Love love love this article.
fastcompany:

How Jenna Lyons Transformed J.Crew Into A Cult Brand
Read here how Jenna Lyons has take J.Crew from ugly duckling to fashion arbiter. 

Love love love this article.
fastcompany:

How Jenna Lyons Transformed J.Crew Into A Cult Brand
Read here how Jenna Lyons has take J.Crew from ugly duckling to fashion arbiter. 

Love love love this article.
fastcompany:

How Jenna Lyons Transformed J.Crew Into A Cult Brand
Read here how Jenna Lyons has take J.Crew from ugly duckling to fashion arbiter. 

Love love love this article.
fastcompany:

How Jenna Lyons Transformed J.Crew Into A Cult Brand
Read here how Jenna Lyons has take J.Crew from ugly duckling to fashion arbiter. 

Love love love this article.